Off The Bookshelf: Pride and Prejudice

Welcome back to my Off The Bookshelf segment! It’s been almost a year since I’ve written a book review for my blog, which is a shame since I do love recommending my favorite novels. The good news is that I read several new books last year and plan to read even more this year, so I’ll have plenty of material to work with in 2017!

So today, I’d like to start off this year’s reviews with my favorite novel from my 2016 list: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen!

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

Summary

First printed in 1813, Pride and Prejudice is Jane Austen’s second published novel and one of the most beloved works in English literature. The novel follows the story of Elizabeth Bennet, an exceptionally clever young woman and the second of a country gentleman’s five daughters, as she navigates issues of manners, morality, education, and romance in the landed gentry society of the British Regency. Among her greatest challenges is dealing with Mr. Darcy, a gentleman with great wealth and even greater pride with whom she repeatedly clashes. As their relationship progresses, both Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy come to learn that first impressions are often misleading, and that they must overcome their pride and their prejudices before the story can reach its happy conclusion.

Review

Every so often, you come across a story so well written, so absolutely brilliant that it draws you in from the first sentence and keeps you hooked to the very last page. Such was my experience with Pride and Prejudice, a literary masterpiece from a brilliant mind of the turn of the 19th century. Jane Austen’s novel is still beloved by many readers today, and with good reason: it’s a comedy that covers some of humanity’s most relatable issues – love, marriage, etiquette, wealth, and morals – all from the perspective of an astute young heroine who challenges and overcomes the obstacles of her social position to achieve her happy ending.

Movie poster for Pride and Prejudice (2005)

Naturally, a central theme in Elizabeth’s story is the difference between the superficial and the indispensable, as well as the emotional development that comes with learning to distinguish the two. After all, there’s a reason the novel was originally titled First Impressions. In the beginning, the protagonist has a habit of forming her opinions of people immediately and consolidating those opinions through selective observation, a practice she believes is a credit to her intelligence. As a result, she dislikes Mr. Darcy from the day she meets him and grows to despise him the more time she spends with him, while Mr. Wickham earns her favor instantly with his charm and apparent good breeding. Halfway through the story, however, Elizabeth discovers that her preconceptions of both gentlemen were misplaced, proving that appearance isn’t always the best indicator of worth. The same lesson is learned by Mr. Darcy, who initially believes his proud behavior to be justified but is promptly put in his place by a woman he once thought was beneath him. Fortunately, both these characters prove mature enough to shed their most prominent flaws in favor of the romance that will make them “the happiest couple in the world”. First impressions are powerful, but thankfully they don’t always stick!

Another of my favorite themes of the book is the only-too-familiar contrast between proper behavior and real character. Throughout the narrative, it’s made apparent that while everyone behaves politely, some characters only do so to maintain a respectable place in high society while others are genuinely good at heart. A notable example comes up during a scene in Netherfield: when Elizabeth arrives at the Bingleys’ estate to take care of her sister Jane, who has fallen ill, all three of her hosts smile and treat her with the utmost kindness and hospitality. The second she leaves the room, however, Caroline and Louisa start criticizing Elizabeth’s dirty clothes while Charles remarks on how much she must love her sister to have walked so far on muddy roads just to see her. Even among siblings, people can vary greatly in character, but good manners are universal!

Austen was always an expert at implementing irony and satire in her writing, and Pride and Prejudice is no exception. Being witty and lively by nature, much of Elizabeth’s perspective includes hints of criticism about her reality: the influence of her family’s low income on their social standing (e.g. Jane’s failed friendship with Caroline Bingley), the excessive pride of some of her wealthier acquaintances (e.g. the unintentional insults in Mr. Darcy’s proposal), marriage as a requirement for women to secure a respectable position in society (e.g. Charlotte Lucas agreeing to marry Mr. Collins, a man she doesn’t love). And while the author didn’t necessarily discourage the following of such social rules in her novels, she did present them in a comical light that at least called these societal standards into question.

Overall, Pride and Prejudice is a fantastic novel that I would highly recommend to anyone who enjoys clever insights into human thoughts and behavior. For romantics and realists alike, this story has something for everyone and will surely continue to captivate audiences for generations, broadening our perceptions of the societal norms by which we live. To anyone who loves literature, it’s certainly an enlightening and delightfully entertaining read!

Inspiration

Ms. Austen’s beloved novel is one of those classic pieces of fiction that remains relevant long after its time. Though the story takes place in the early 19th century, its themes of social conduct, proper etiquette, and first impressions are still universal in the modern world. Whenever I need inspiration for character development, I know I can turn to an Austen novel for insight on general behavior and the restrictions of polite society to better understand how people think and function in everyday life. Basically, Pride and Prejudice is an excellent example of a point I’ve made in the past: that historical fiction can show us the elements of human nature that don’t change over time.

If you’re a historical fiction author or a writer of stories about the human condition, Pride and Prejudice will definitely be a great source of inspiration for your characters, whether they’re 19th-century country folk, 21st-century city dwellers, or anything in between. The greatest stories are those that explore what it means to be human, which makes it no surprise that this novel always appears near the top of best-books-ever-written lists. So if you haven’t yet, I strongly urge you to pick up a copy of Pride and Prejudice and see for yourself what a delightful read it truly is. You may find to your amazement that despite having lived so long ago, Jane Austen can still teach you a thing or two about the ironies of your economic and social reality!

Five More Books I Want to Read in 2017

Welcome to the second part of my top ten list of books to read in 2017! Looks like another Goodreads reading challenge is on the horizon! If you haven’t yet, feel free to check out the first half of my list from last week. Otherwise, enjoy!

6) Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Here’s another selection from last year that I didn’t get around to reading in 2016. Hopefully I’ll have better luck with it this year! Wuthering Heights has been on my to-read list for a while, even before I received a copy as a gift some years ago. With quite a few dystopian novels making it on my list for 2017, I’m sure a break for historical fiction will be more than welcome!

7) The Martian by Andy Weir

After indulging in so many historical novels last year, it’s time I start picking up more science fiction. After watching this movie in 2015 and loving it, I decided to read the book on which it was based, though it would still be a while before I could get my hands on a copy. Now that I’m starting a new chapter of my life and should have a little more free time, I look forward to adding The Martian to my list of reads for 2017!

8) Shogun by James Clavell

This book was recommended to me by my parents, both of whom read it a long time ago and loved it. The fact that they want me to pick it up is a sign of how well they know me, because one of my greatest obsessions in life has long been the culture and history of Japan! Maybe it’s the fact that I’m part Japanese myself, but something about the country just draws me in and intrigues me to no end. It’s a long read for sure, but if I find the time this year, I’d love to give Shogun a try!

9) The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Here’s another selection that made it onto my list by recommendation, in this case by my boyfriend. He read this book a while back and really enjoyed it, though he did warn me it would be kind of depressing. Still, the author’s unique style of storytelling stands out and will certainly make The Road an interesting choice for my 2017 reads!

10) StarTalk, edited by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Jeffrey Simons, and Charles Liu

Fully titled StarTalk: Everything You Ever Need to Know About Space Travel, Sci-Fi, the Human Race, the Universe, and Beyond, this book is essentially a written adaptation of Neil deGrasse Tyson’s popular podcast and National Geographic TV series, full of scientific questions and answers about the Universe as we know (or don’t know) it. I know it’s not like the other selections on this list, but similar to last year’s format, I’d like to include at least one nonfiction book in my 2017 lineup. I gave this book as a Christmas present to my boyfriend in 2016, though it was really a gift for both of us as I have every intention of borrowing it! I’ve always been fascinated with science in general and space in particular, so StarTalk is definitely a book I’ll enjoy reading this year!

This concludes my list of books to read in 2017! I hope you enjoyed it, and as always, thanks for reading!

What about you? Any books you’d like to read this year? What other goals have you set for 2017?

Five Books I Want to Read in 2017

As everyone knows, with January comes a fresh batch of new year’s resolutions. Since I really enjoyed making a list of books to read last year, I decided to try my luck again with a new list for 2017! Well, semi-new; some of them will be repeats of books I didn’t get around to reading in 2016, but that I’ll hopefully have better luck with this year. Either way, here’s to a bright new year of reading!

So to kick off my 2017 goals, here’s the first half of my list of the top ten books I want to read this year. Enjoy!

1) A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Oh yes, I’m still working on this one. I started reading A Game of Thrones a couple of years ago, but after school started taking up most of my time, I had to put it down for a while. My resolution from last year to read every day has helped me pick it up again, though, and now that I’m done with school, maybe I’ll finally be able to finish it this year! Of course, seeing how long it’s taking me just to get through the first book, I’ll probably have to pick up the rest of the A Song of Ice and Fire saga from the TV series!

2) The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

That’s right, I still haven’t read the Hunger Games trilogy! Crazy, right? I know I had wanted to start reading more dystopian fiction last year, but I guess I got so caught up in historical fiction that there just wasn’t enough time for anything else. These books are at the top of my list, though, so hopefully I’ll find the time to finally read them this year. I look forward to enjoying a new fiction genre in 2017!

3) Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Speaking of dystopian fiction, here’s another book that’s been on my to-read list for a long time. I remember watching the film adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 for an Introduction to Technology class in middle school, but to this day I haven’t gotten around to reading the book. I enjoy stories that explore the dangers of mass media, state-based censorship, and an ignorant society, so this book is a definite must-read for me – if not this year, then at least for my bucket list!

4) Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

This one was recommended to me by my boyfriend, who started reading the book last year and has really been enjoying it so far. Ready Player One certainly sounds like the sort of novel I’d like: a science fiction story set primarily in a virtual world and rife with 80s pop culture references. I am planning to read more sci-fi this year, so this will definitely be an interesting pick for my 2017 list!

5) 1984 by George Orwell

I know, this book is on everyone’s to-read list, but it’s so iconic that I just couldn’t leave it off mine any longer. George Orwell’s classic dystopian novel is so relevant to modern-day society, it’s terrifying to think the most glaring mistake in the author’s prediction of the future may well be that he was only off by a few decades. Exploring themes of authoritarianism, totalitarianism, censorship, and historical negationism, 1984 is the epitome of political dystopian fiction. It doesn’t sound like the most uplifting choice for my 2017 reads, but… well, let’s just say, I have a feeling this novel will be more relevant this year than ever!

That’s it for today’s to-read list! Tune in next week for the second half of my top ten list of books to read in 2017! Thanks for reading!

What about you? What books do you plan to read in 2017? Have you made any other resolutions for the new year?

My Reading Goals: Books I’ve Read in 2016

The end of 2016 is finally on the horizon, and as I look back on my achievements over the past twelve months, I’m proud to say I’ve accomplished quite a lot. One of my major goals going in was to win my Goodreads Reading Challenge, a set goal of how many books I wanted to read in 2016. I may not have set the bar particularly high for my first try, but I’m still happy to have reached it!

So after two January posts on the ten books I wanted to read this year and a midyear progress report in July, here is my final report on my reading challenge goals for 2016. Enjoy!

2016 Reading Goal: 10 books

Total books read in 2016: 10 books (100%)

Books I planned to read this year and did

  1. Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen
  2. The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde
  3. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, by J.K. Rowling

Books I planned to read this year but didn’t

  1. Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë
  2. Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë
  3. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
  4. Divergent, by Veronica Roth
  5. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, by William Shakespeare

Books I read this year but didn’t plan to

  1. The Tales of Beedle the Bard, by J.K. Rowling
  2. Jonathan Livingston Seagull, by Richard Bach
  3. The BFG, by Roald Dahl
  4. The Taming of the Shrew, by William Shakespeare
  5. Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott
  6. Quidditch Through the Ages, by J.K. Rowling
  7. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen

Books I’m still reading

  1. A Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin
  2. Tree Thinking: An Introduction to Phylogenetic Biology, by David A. Baum & Stacey D. Smith

And last but not least…

My Favorite Book of the Year: Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

What about you? Did you set any reading goals this year? Were you able to meet them? What were your favorite books of the year?

The Halfway Point: Progress Report on My 2016 Reading Goals

Are we already halfway through 2016? How did that happen? Time is an evasive little thing, isn’t it? Anyway, we’re going into July now, so I figured now is the perfect time for a quick break to assess the progress on my 2016 reading goals. How am I doing so far? Let’s see!

My Reading Goals

Goodreads_Reading_Challenge_2016At the beginning of the year, I set a goal to read ten books for the Goodreads 2016 Reading Challenge. I even shared a couple of blog posts in January detailing which books I wanted to read this year. It seemed like a reasonable goal for me; I wanted to push myself to start reading more fiction again and finally take up those untouched books sitting on my shelf, but I also couldn’t set the bar too high for fear of falling behind due to school. Ten books a year is fewer than a book a month, and while that may not seem like much to truly avid readers, it’s proven to be an excellent starting point for me, as I’m already more than halfway to my goal!

I plan to write an in-depth post on my 2016 goals at the end of the year, but for now, here’s a quick recap of the books I’ve read so far, am currently reading, and still plan to read:

Books I’ve read so far

  1. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, by J.K. Rowling
  2. The Tales of Beedle the Bard, by J.K. Rowling
  3. Jonathan Livingston Seagull, by Richard Bach
  4. Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen
  5. The BFG, by Roald Dahl
  6. The Taming of the Shrew, by William Shakespeare
  7. The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde

Books I’m currently reading

  1. Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott
  2. A Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin

Books I still plan to read

  1. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
  2. Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë
  3. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

What about you? Any goals you’re still working toward this year? Which ones have you completed, if any?

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