Mother’s Day is this Sunday, and to mark the occasion, I thought it would be fun to share a list of some favorite moms in fiction! Mothers are undeniably among the most important figures in family dynamics, so it’s no surprise that fictional mothers also play a highly influential role in the lives of other characters in a story. There are so many famous mothers in literature, television, and film that it was hard to narrow this list down, but at last I managed to put together a post on the memorable moms in my favorite stories. They each have different strengths and weaknesses, but in the end, they’re all loving and dedicated parents!

So to celebrate the upcoming holiday, here is a list of my five favorite mothers in fiction. Enjoy, and Happy Mother’s Day!

1) Molly Weasley (The Harry Potter series)

NOT MY DAUGHTER, YOU BITCH! – Molly Weasley to Bellatrix Lestrange, whose Killing Curse had just narrowly missed Ginny

Molly Weasley, Ron’s mother in the Harry Potter series, may well be one of my favorite moms in all of literature. Not only has she raised seven children (and done a fine job of it too), but her maternal instincts are so strong that she extends her nurturing love to her youngest son’s best friends. Molly makes perfectly clear to Harry and Hermione that they’re always welcome in her home, and within moments of their first meeting, she quickly becomes to Harry the mother figure he never had growing up. Mrs. Weasley is proof that whether a witch or a Muggle, a mother will do anything for her children: while she runs a tight household and never hesitates to keep her mischievous sons in check, she is so fiercely protective of her children that she willingly steps between them and Death itself (namely Death Eater Bellatrix Lestrange) to keep them safe. The ideal mix of loving parent and badass witch, Molly Weasley is truly everyone’s favorite magical mom!

2) Margaret “Marmee” March (Little Women)

Don’t you feel that it is pleasanter to help one another, to have daily duties which make leisure sweet when it comes, and to bear and forbear, that home may be comfortable and lovely to us all? – Mrs. March to her daughters after their week-long “experiment” in being idle

While Little Women centers on the various stories of four sisters growing up in 19th-century New England, it’s made clear in the beginning of the book that they all share a common aspiration: to live up to the example of their mother. Among women in classic literature, Mrs. March (known as “Marmee” by her daughters) is often held up as the image of the perfect mother: patient, compassionate, and highly principled. She works hard to support her family while her husband is at war, she cheerfully contributes to charity and the war effort, and she always has time to console her daughters no matter how busy she is. Yet Marmee does even more for her children by raising them all to be the best people they can possibly be, ensuring they’re all well educated and independent thinkers, encouraging them to marry for love instead of money, and always being there to offer them advice while still allowing them to learn from their own mistakes. With such a strong and loving mother to guide them, it’s no wonder the March sisters aspire to be such fine “little women”!

3) Queen Elinor of DunBroch (Brave)

Oh, my brave wee lass, I’m here. I’ll always be right here. – Elinor to a frightened young Merida

I’ve mentioned before that I often watch Brave and see my own relationship with my mother in Princess Merida’s relationship with hers. From the beginning of the film, Queen Elinor is determined to teach her daughter every possible lesson on proper princess behavior, from etiquette to diplomacy to compassion. Though at first it seems that her words never stick due to Merida’s strong will and stubbornness, it becomes clear toward the end of the story that no matter how many times they’ve butted heads over the years, Elinor’s wisdom did make an impression on her daughter after all. Merida mostly takes after her father on the outside, but it’s her mother’s lessons that help her calm the other royal families and ultimately get her through her trial. Elinor in turn also learns much about Merida throughout their adventure, enough to eventually shed her uptight persona and allow her daughter the freedom she’s always wanted to live her own life. A mother and daughter may not always see eye to eye, but the love between them is still one of the strongest bonds in the world!

4) Lady Cora Crawley (Downton Abbey)

You are being tested. And you know what they say, my darling: being tested only makes you stronger. – Cora to Edith after the latter was left at the altar

The Dowager Countess may be one of my favorite characters overall in Julian Fellowes’ popular period drama, but as far as mothers go, Lady Grantham probably sets the best example in Downton Abbey. Cora Crawley is the mother of three daughters, each with her own personality and aspirations, yet she always seems to know how best to handle each one—a difficult task given how the two elder sisters are always at each other’s throats. Generally sweet and willing to believe the best of anyone, Her Ladyship also proves to be a strong and highly capable woman: during World War I, she agrees to make Downton a convalescent home for recovering soldiers and works full-time to assist in running it, an experience that prepares her for her eventual position as President of Downton Hospital at the end of the series. She is quicker to embrace change than the rest of her family and is kind even to her servants, earning her immense respect among the staff of Downton. Overall, Cora is a loving motherly figure and, even as an American heiress and aristocrat in early 20th-century England, sets an exceptional example of a modern woman for her daughters!

5) Mrs. Bennet (Pride and Prejudice)

When you have five daughters, Lizzie, tell me what else will occupy your thoughts, and then perhaps you will understand. – Mrs. Bennet to Elizabeth on why she thinks of nothing but marrying off her daughters

Yes, I know she’s not the best mother, or even a good mother on many counts, but given all the times she made me laugh, there was no way I could leave Mrs. Bennet off this list. Throughout Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth’s father and younger sisters are embarrassing enough, but her mother proves by far the most humiliating of all. Foolish, noisy, and downright vulgar, Mrs. Bennet’s actions are solely driven by her desperation to marry her five daughters off to fine gentlemen, which often has the adverse effect of driving away the very suitors she tries to attract. Still, this simple woman provides much of the comedy in Jane Austen’s beloved novel, and for all the grief she gives her eldest daughters, she still manages to get what she wants in the end, gaining two wealthy sons-in-law and happy marriages for the most deserving of her children. She may go about it the wrong way, but readers can’t deny that her intentions, however misguided, are always good, even if just for a few laughs!

Who are your favorite fictional mothers? What other mothers in fiction would you add to this list?

Dedicated to my mom and all the other amazing mothers out there! Thank you for all your love, patience, and support! Happy Mother’s Day!

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