Gaslighted

My first mistake was trusting him enough to give him everything. My second was getting caught taking it back.

Sanity’s a funny thing. You take it for granted your whole life, until one day you hear the neighbors calling you crazy as they watch you being shoved into a police car. Whatever happens in between is a mystery.

We started out fine. He was sweet, charming, everything I looked for in a man. I fell head over heels for him. It was after we got married that things went south. That was when he started calling me names and putting me down. At first I dismissed it as playful teasing, but then he started exploiting my deepest insecurities. The words became more painful, bitter, and downright cruel, until I wasn’t laughing about anything anymore. The worst part was that I believed every word he said, and he knew it. He knew exactly how to hit me where it hurt.

The real trouble came when he started casting doubt over everything I said and did. He was so confident in contradicting me that it got to a point where I couldn’t disagree anymore. I lost all sense of what I knew and who I was. I stopped trusting my own judgment. I became dependent on him to tell me what was real and what wasn’t. Everything that happened to me became a question of my own sanity.

So you can imagine my confusion that night when I walked in on him in bed with another woman.

My first instinct was to scream, then to cry, then to curse at him for cheating on me. But he shrugged my words off like they were nothing. He didn’t even acknowledge the woman lying next to him; no matter how much I yelled or how many times I pointed her out, he just shook his head and stared at me like I was crazy. So finally I gave up and stormed downstairs in tears, once again questioning my perception of reality.

And I might have walked away believing he was right, that nothing I just saw had really happened… if I hadn’t found her bra hanging over the banister.

When I took that foreign garment in my hands, I realized that I didn’t need anyone to tell me it wasn’t mine or that it really existed. It suddenly became clear that I never needed him to tell me what was real because I knew all along. I never imagined anything. Everything he ever did to me, he did to hurt me, to manipulate me, to break me. He took everything from me. And he had to pay.

Now when I say I can’t remember what happened next, I mean it. One minute I was in the kitchen staring at the stove, the next I was out on the sidewalk watching the house go up in flames. Sometimes flashes of candles and a lit match cross my memory, but that’s it.

I still wonder if I might have gotten away with it if the neighbors hadn’t heard the commotion upstairs or seen me leave the house minutes before the explosion. To be honest, I don’t really care. I know that’s not what you want to hear, but it’s the truth. I’m just glad he got what he deserved.

I don’t know how I let him push me to that point. But I do know why I killed him.

Whether all this warrants conviction for double homicide is up to the jury. I’m sure as my lawyer, you’ll want to spin this story in any way that makes me look like the victim, and that’s fine. I just needed someone else to know the truth, so I could prove to myself once and for all that I know what really happened.

The bastard gaslighted me. I simply returned the favor.

What If? Writing Prompts: Fantasy / Science Fiction VII

So lately I’ve been playing around with Canva, and I’ve come up with a new image for my “What If?” Writing Prompts segment! To be honest, I’ve felt for a while that it was time for a change, so today I’m debuting this new “social media friendly” image with a fresh set of fantasy and science fiction prompts! See what new stories you can write based on these ideas, and feel free to add more of your own! Enjoy!

What if… in the future, wars were waged entirely by artificial intelligence with no human input?

What if… you died, only to wake up and discover you’d been living in a virtual reality all along?

What if… you switched bodies with an extraterrestrial and had to find a way to switch back before it could destroy your home?

What if… you spent so much time in virtual reality that you couldn’t tell the difference between the real world and the virtual world anymore?

What if… you brought home a mysterious rock you found… that turned out to be a dragon egg?

Good luck writing more stories in science fiction and fantasy!

If you have any “What If?” writing prompt suggestions (for any theme), please feel free to share them in the comments below. Ideas I like may be featured in future “What If?” posts, with full credit and a link to your blog (if you have one)! Also, if you’ve written a piece based on an idea you’ve found here, be sure to link back to the respective “What If?” post. I would love to see what you’ve done with the prompt! Thank you!

Word of the Week: Lilliputian

Word: Lilliputian

Pronunciation: li-lə-PYOO-sh(ə)n

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: trivial or very small

Source: Oxford Dictionaries


I shall personally see to it that the demented, drooling, slime-breathed little Lilliputian who owns this disgusting ribbon will never see the light of day again!
– Miss Trunchbull, Matilda (1996)

Continuing from last week’s theme of Gulliver’s Travels words, today’s Word of the Week entry features another adjective taken from Jonathan Swift’s most famous novel. In the above scene from the 1996 film Matilda, Miss Trunchbull has assembled Miss Honey’s class to accuse one of them of breaking into her house to terrorize her the night before. Her one clue to the culprit’s identity is the ribbon she found outside her house, and though she already knows it belongs to Matilda, she takes her time building up the fear in all the children with a particularly elaborate threat. Harsh as they are, at least one of her chosen words is accurate; compared to the towering Trunchbull, Matilda and her classmates are indeed “Lilliputian”!

Anything described as “Lilliputian” is very small or trivial. The word arose in the early 18th century and was created by Irish author Jonathan Swift for his novel Gulliver’s Travels. This word comes from the name of Swift’s fictional land Lilliput, which is populated by people six inches tall.

Though I first heard the word “Lilliputian” in Matilda years ago, I only recently learned what it means; until now, I assumed it was just another of the Trunchbull’s countless creative insults for children (it certainly sounds like one!). Like “Brobdingnagian”, “Lilliputian” also doubles as a noun (in this case, for a tiny person or thing) and should always be capitalized as it derives from a proper noun. If you write about trivial things or characters who are exceptionally small, “Lilliputian” may be a good word to consider for your stories!

What are your thoughts on this word? Any suggestions for future “Word of the Week” featured words?

Sonnet to the Baby Sister

The youngest sister in the family
Has always known the joy of having more:
The parents’ attention for the baby
And stuff from two sisters who came before.

It wasn’t always easy for the rest:
The elder two who hardly had a say.
At being cute, you always were the best,
And never seemed to fail to get your way.

Yet ever since the day you came along,
You’ve blessed us all, a gift from God above.
You grace us with your energy and song,
And fill our lives with never-ending love.

So Happy Birthday to my baby sis!
With love from your big sister, with a kiss!


Happy Birthday to my awesome baby sister! Keep on being the wonderful person you are! I love you!

The Halfway Point: Progress Report on My 2017 Reading Goals

Yes, we’re already halfway through 2017! Amazing, isn’t it? Now that we’re in July, it’s once again time to assess our progress on our reading goals for the year. I’ll go first!

My 2017 Reading Goals

Like I did last year, I set a goal of ten books for the Goodreads 2017 Reading Challenge, a reasonable goal for a relatively slow reader like me. So far, I’ve met half my goal for the year! I’ve also noticed a trend of more books from my to-read list in January actually reaching my have-read collection, as well as more nonfiction books making the list (thanks in no small part to my pursuit of a freelancing career).

I plan to write a more detailed report on my 2017 reading goals at the end of the year. In the meantime, here’s a brief review of the books I’ve read so far, am currently reading, and still plan to read:

Books I’ve read so far

  1. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
  2. A Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin
  3. I Am Pusheen The Cat, by Claire Belton
  4. High Performance Paperback, by Ray Brehm and Jim Molinelli
  5. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

Books I’m currently reading

  1. 1984, by George Orwell
  2. Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline
  3. You Are A Writer, by Jeff Goins
  4. The Business of Writing & Editing, by Sagan Morrow

Books I still plan to read

  1. Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë
  2. Arrival, by Ted Chiang
  3. StarTalk, by Neil deGrasse Tyson

Your turn! Any reading goals you’re still working toward this year? Which ones have you completed so far?

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